Salamanca; Just before Sunrise

Salamanca; Just before Sunrise

Salamanca; Just before Sunrise

I love sunrise, it is a quiet beautiful time of day. I will admit that in my youth I was more apt to witness the sunrise as a close to a beautiful evening! But now, a little older, I awake to see the sunrise, and it is the beginning of a new day. Today, we headed out to photograph the Roman Bridge, and Salamanca Cathedral, but there was not much of a sunrise, it was cloudy and dark, the streets were wet with rain.  This was the best shot of the morning, I decided to give it a textured, painted quality and processed it using one of Kim Klassen’s beautiful textures.  Continue reading

Salamanca Spain, Plaza Mayor; In and Out of the Shops

In and Outside: Plaza Mayor, Salamanca Spain

In and Outside: Plaza Mayor, Salamanca Spain

Plaza Mayor, Salamanca Spain, a hub of activity in the centre of town. We arrived in Salamanca just prior to Holy Week, along with a lot of other tourists and travellers. The squares, markets and streets are busy. The shop windows are lined with goods for sale and reflect the patio umbrellas, tables and people visiting the square. While each of the images are “busy” and may even look chaotic to some, they represent the activity in Plaza Mayor and the city of Salamanca these days.

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Old Town, Caceres Spain

Old Town Caceres Spain, stone walls, cobblestone streets, and church towers

Old Town Caceres Spain, stone walls, cobblestone streets, and church towers 

We spent almost a week in Caceres Spain, walking the street of the old town, visiting the Churches, cafe’s and bell towers; there is so much to show you, but for now just a few of the quiet streets and alleyways….

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Caceres Spain

Old Town; Caceres Spain

Old Town; Caceres Spain

We have spent a few days visiting the city of Cacres Spain, wandering the streets of the old town. Cáceres was declared a World Heritage City by UNESCO in 1986 because of the city’s blend of Roman, Moorish and  Italian Renaissance Architecture.  Thirty towers from the Islamic period still stand in Cáceres I was standing in the bell tower of the Santa Maria, and was able to get a great view of the streets and of the Church of Francisco Javier and it’s two white towers that is visible from almost anywhere in the city. snail_IMG_6880 We are moving through Spain at a snail’s pace, but enjoying every minute, warm sunshine, great food, and most importantly friendly helpful people. We are amassing a large number of photographs, with no time for processing and that is as Martha Stewart would say “a good thing”

Red Poppy and Raindrops

Red Poppy

Red Poppy and Raindrops 

It rained enough today to pull on the poncho’s, a soft gentle rain that is good for the ground and the flowers. I needed to get down in the grass along the side of the road, to get close enough to the poppy I wanted to show the raindrops, and then wait for that perfect moment when she was standing still to get this shot.

I love seeing the beautiful red poppies blowing in the breeze beside the road.

The timing for our walk through Spain, and the Via la Plata has been perfect for spring flowers.

Hopefully we have more sunshine and less rain tomorrow.

Los Milagros Aqueduct, Merida Spain

Los Miagros Acqueduct, Merida Spain

Los Milagros aqueduct, Merida Spain 

The Los Milagros aqueduct was built between 1 B.C. and 3 A.D., it was 830 meters long and 25 meters high, made of brick and concrete it was faced with granite ashlars. It was used to transport water from the Prosperina lake to the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta know today as Merida Spain. Today about 38 arches still stand.

Los Milagros aqueduct, Merida Spain

Los Milagros aqueduct, Merida Spain  

The Los Milagros aqueduct is one of three aqueducts build in the area, and preserved as part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site at Merida.

 

Walking with the Romans: Part 2

Roman Bridge over the River Guadiana. Merida Sapin

Roman Bridge over the River Guadiana. Merida Sapin

Merida is not a large place, with a population of around 64,000 people. A pleasant place, it is not different from many other Spanish towns, with friendly people, many bars and restaurants with one exception, that being that as being one of the Roman Empires capitals in the Iberian Peninsula it is home to some of the best preserved Roman Ruins in Europe. As a result in 1993 it was established as a World Heritage site by UNESCO.The town was founded in 25 BC, with the name of Emerita Augusta which means discharged soldiers – of the army of Augustus, who founded the city; the current name Mérida was derive from this, changed and altered by its conquest by the Muslims and other down through history. Its main purpose for all these conquers was to protect a bridge over the River Guadiana.

The path of the Camino Pilgrim will take you over this bridge with 64 granite arches that remain intact and in use to this day as a pedestrian walkway and is one of the longest Roman bridges remaining in existence.  At the end of this bridge stands the Alcazaba a fortress that was initially built by the Romans, but later occupied by the Moors. Over it main gate you will find a reference dedicating it to Allah.

from the Alcazaba in Merida Spain.

from the Alcazaba in Merida Spain.

In more recent history it was taken and occupied by Napoleon, and both opposing side of the Spanish Civil Wars, such was its strategic importance. Further into the town you will find sitting side by side, a Roman Forum and Theatre. The former similar to that found in Italica, was use for gladiator fights and as you proceeds down the stairs into the ring it offers life-size mock ups of the different types of gladiators, their specific armour and who they would normally fight. However of the two the theatre is the most spectacular. While breathtaking as a tourist attraction, it is still used for plays and festivals by the local population.

Roman Forum, Merida Spain

Roman Forum, Merida Spain

Roman Amphitheater, Merida Spain

Roman Amphitheater, Merida Spain

Equally as spectacular is the Temple of Diana. Surprisingly this building is surrounded by a simple fence low fence to protect it from errant tourists, is located close to the centre of town on one of Merida many pedestrian walkways, such that hundreds of working Spaniards walk by it ever day on the way to and from work.

Temple Diana, Merida Spain

Temple Diana, Merida Spain

more great stories and architecture tomorrow….

Text by W.E.Foreman Photos by JMeyersForeman

Plaza Espana, Merida Spain,

Plaza Espana, Merida Spain on a Saturday night

Plaza Espana, Merida Spain on a Saturday night 

We were sitting having a glass of wine in the Plaza Mayor, here in Merida last night. It was full of kids playing, parents with strollers, and old people walking hand in hand.  Thought out the square there are about 4 or 5 Tapa bars where music was playing, and people were visiting. I decided a long exposure showing people moving about was a wonderful way of capturing the light, and the life of the square.