Seville Inspired

We loved our time in Seville, and I think I can safely say that we will return.

digital artistry, inspired by our time in Seville.

One of the unique features in Spain are the rolling shutters that cover the storefront doors. Metal doors, that roll down at night, or when the store is closed to cover the door. Many are painted with graffiti, but a good many are painted with unique pictures usually relating to the store. We have even seen a parking garage door painted with a Spanish landscape.

You can see some examples of these murals from the blog post about Madrid.

Bill and I spend a lot of time walking around the cities we visit, I was inspired to try my hand at a little digital art, during the quiet time, when my feet were too tired to walk anymore! Using several images taken during our stay. The image above was my attempt to capture the essence of Seville. Learning how to use blending modes, transform tools, selection tools, erasing, masking, and so many other features of Photoshop was quite a challenge.

This type of art has always appealed to me, but I am not sure I have the creativity for it! Have you tried anything new? I have to remind myself that learning new skills takes time, perfect doesn’t happen overnight, or in one magic moment, so I will keep trying during quiet times when my feet are too tired to walk anymore.

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The Alcazar of Seville

One of the great sites to visit while in Seville is the Alcazar of Seville, a royal palace built for King Peter of Castile. It was built by Castilian Christians of the site of a Muslim residential fortress destroyed after the Christian conquest of Seville. The Palace is a beautiful example of Mudejar architecture in the Iberian Peninsula. The upper levels of the Alcazar are still used by the royal family as their official residence while in Seville.

The integrate details in the tiles cover the walls, mesmerizing to the eye. Arched doorways open into lush gardens, with the smell of oranges in the air. and fountains with just a trickle of water conceals the sounds of the people talking in the nearby rooms. I highly recommend the audio guide to learn more about the palace its’ history.

While in Seville we have also done some Sherry tasking, and trip through the white villages, and an evening watching flamenco dancing.

We have been having a great time here in Seville, but I time here has come to an end. We are off to Malta next week. How has your week been?

Have you been to Malta, any tips or suggests for things to do or see. I would love to hear from you

Hola from Seville

We are having a great time in Seville, sherry tasting, cooking classes and a tour of the city. We have spent time touring the Plaza Espana, the Alcazar, Triana, and the Triana Market. So many beautiful streets, cafes, and plazas.

This week the 52framers challenge was “city life at night” and I decided to try out the pano feature on my new phone

This week on Society6 is offering 25% off all products and free worldwide shipping, just in case you are interested in a new yoga matt, or tote bag now is a good time!

Hola from Seville

I love the light and beautiful balconies

We arrived in Seville late last week, and we have enjoyed walking all the pedestrian streets. I love all the beautiful plazas, amazing architecture, and I especially love the light. Early morning light and the evening light along the streets! 

I have been participating with 52frames, a weekly photo challenge, 

week 4 –

Macro, admittedly I wasn’t overly inspired by the challenge, I was lucky to find the daffodils were blooming in my cousins garden. Thanks, Sharon and Bob for a lovely four days! 

Week 5 –

dirty, okay I am struggling with the challenge, and I am going to have to think about how I approach the challenges each week if I am going to keep them up. While I have been struggling, I have been inspired by the images submitted by many of the photographers, and this does help to motivate me. 

Week 6 – my desk, there are a few coffee shops, we have been enjoying the “coffee con leche” coffee with warm milk, as well as the wonderful pastries while I sit process image, so I pretty sure I will have a better submission this week. 

If you have any suggestions for off the beaten path things to do in or around Seville drop me a line, or if you want more info on the 52framers weekly photo challenge, let me know, I would be happy to send you a link. 

While we have been away I have launched a new website for images taken during our Camino to Santiago de Compostela, I would appreciate if you have a look. I would love to know if you have a favorite image, or if you have done the Camino, your favorite memory or location. 

To see our ongoing travel photos check out my Instagram feed. 

See you again soon. 

Hello from Lisbon

Ascensor da Glória, Calçada da Glória, Lisbon

52Frames week three introduces each of us to fellow photographers from around the world. It is meant to encourage each of us to be a tourist in our own city, and explore the places we haven’t yet seen, or to see old familiar places from a new perspective, that of a tourist. 


I happen to be traveling this week, visiting the beautiful city of Lisbon, so I shall say hello from here rather than my home town.   I started by researching all the “things to do” and “places to see” 4 days into our visit and I feel like there is still so much to see and do, and I don’t think one picture can portray a city.


Lisbon is the city of Seven Hills, and while I feel we have walked all of them, we have used the trams, funiculars and metro system to get around as well. The trams or streetcars have been in use since 1873. Tram 28 provides on the best tours of the city and is a popular tourist attraction. 

While working on the project this week, and wandering around Lisbon I kept asking myself how would someone from Lisbon want their city to be remembered, I am not sure I have the answer yet, and there are still streets to explore.

tram 28 lisbon

Visiting London, and the 52Frames Weekly Challenge; Rule of thirds

London Eye; London England
Visiting London England, and seeing all the sights

It’s been a busy week, we are off on another adventure – three days in London England. The weather has been cloudy and cool but that has not stopped us from walking from one end to the other, seeing the sights, eating pub food and attending the musical at the Shaftsbury theater. While visiting London I have been thinking about the 52frames weekly challenge, which is to create an image using the Rule of Thirds.

The Rule of Thirds is perhaps the most well-known ‘rule’ of photographic composition one of the first things taught to beginning photographers, and one of the compositional rules I heard over and over again as part of the camera club. 

The basic principle behind the rule is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds both horizontally and vertically, so that there are 9 equal parts, like a tic tac toe board. Many of the modern cameras can be set to display a grid, check your user manual if are interested in learning more about this. 

The grid identifies important points you should consider placing the subject of elements of interest as you frame your image. Proponents of the technique claim that aligning a subject with these points create more tension, energy, and interest in the composition than simply entering the subject. The Rule of Thirds does a few things for composition. First, it gets new photographers off the habit of centering the subject by default and thinking about the entire frame. Second, it creates empty space that helps draw the viewer’s eye into the subject.

52 frames weekly photo challenge – Self-portrait

self-portrait, reflection in the store window, with photo of model appears to be looking at me, the photographer
oh oh oh, people are looking at me!

This weeks challenge was to create a self-portrait, something I was not looking forward to. As a photographer, I am much more comfortable holding a camera than getting my picture taken. The 52Frames website provided a number of links and I recommend a read if you are interested in creating a self-portrait, or using this as a theme for an ongoing project, the links and information were helpful and inspiring.

A google image search for self-portraits was most helpful and inspiring, there I found the work of Vivian Maier, combining street photography with self-portraiture use to catch her own reflection in shop windows, and mirrors. I felt that the self-portraits not only gave us some small insight into her but also daily life and the city in which she lived and worked.

While Vivian Maier used a twin reflex camera, one that you would look down through a mirror to frame your photo. I used both my DLSR and phone camera for this project. Both the phone and DLSR allowed me to frame the image like the twin reflex camera Ms. Maier used, and I found that helpful. It was quite amazing to me how much the angle of the camera, and where it was held changed the final image from what I saw with my own eyes.

Some of the other challenges, finding dark windows, there isn’t much of a reflection when a window has a light behind it. Dirty windows, and the stuff found in the window alway made a difference to the outcome. I also found that there were occasions when the double pane window showed up, almost as a double exposure, and I think the effect was magnified more when the camera was held more at an angle to the window, rather than straight on.

Have a look at results from this week, I would love to hear which image you think was most successful, and why. Have I inspired you to give it a try?

Last Day of 2018, looking back and looking forward!

blue glass paperweight and tinfoil used to create an abstract

It has been a while since I have written a blog post, during 2018 I seem to spend a great deal of time sorting, organizing, moving or discarding as we moved, downsized to a condo. A place that is close to the river with lots of walking paths, natural areas yet close to the center of town for shopping, restaurants, festivals, and activities.  While the move has been good for us, lots of walking, less time in traffic, it has taken a lot of time and energy, and I haven’t been inspired to pick up my camera too often.

For me December is a time to reflect back on the year, and what do I want to do next year.  I have a couple of projects that I will share with you as they evolve,  for now, I have decided to take on a 52-week photo challenge.

I wanted something that will inspire me, pick up the camera, a community that I can learn from and who would share their work, and to some degree of accountability and encouragement. After reviewing a few websites I came across 52frames.com they offer a guided weekly photography challenge.

Last week’s challenge was to combine three previous challenges, my first submission celebrating the imperfections (week 4 wabi-sabi) of the blue (week 2) glass paperweight, I was able to create an abstract (week 16) and in the process discovered a new universe.

I am pretty happy with the results, next week’s challenge could be a deal breaker – a self-portrait, like most people I hate having my photo taken. Like so many, I am critical of how I look, feel awkward in front of a camera, and generally have more fun hiding behind the camera! 52framers provide lots of links, great information, and inspiration on self-portraiture. I admire those who choose this theme a long-term project.

I would like to take this opportunity to wish you all the best to you and your family in 2019. Wish me luck on my 52-week photography challenge and stay tuned to see what I am inspired to photograph, and let me know if you are working on a weekly challenge.

Miror d’eau Water Mirror Bordeaux France

The Miroir d’eau (Water Mirror) or Miroir des Quais (Quay Mirror) in Bordeaux is the world’s largest[1] reflecting pool, covering 3,450 square meters (37,100 sq ft). Located on the quay of the Garonne in front of the Place de la Bourse,

I have been working my way through old image files, and remembering the time we spent in Bordeaux France. 

The Water Mirror was beautiful, located across from Place de la Bourse, between Quai de la Douane and Quai Louis XVIII, this spectacular pool, designed by landscape artist Michel Corajoud, alternates a mirror effect and artificial misting in an extraordinary way. 

Located between the Garonne and beautiful 18th-century façades, and is listed as a contemporary World Heritage Site. 

Free-lensing

 I have been experimenting with a new, for me, photographic techniques, free-lensing. I have experimented with this before, but this week I I took some time to read more about the technique and experiment with more intent. I have made some notes just in case you are interested in how this works or want to try this yourself.

Free-lensing, defined as a technique used with interchangeable lens cameras in both film-based and digital photography. The lens is detached from the camera and held in front of the lens mount by hand during exposure. This allows the lens to be tilted or shifted creating a similar effect to a perspective control or “Tilt-Shift” lens, only with a lower degree of fidelity. The result is a combination of selective focus and light leakage which are used creatively to create surreal imagery.

The lens used does not necessarily have to be native to the brand of camera, since it is not physically attached. In addition, the lens may also be reversed for Macro Photography. By shooting through a  lens backward, increased magnification can be achieved. One of the by-products of free-lensing is the introduction of “light leaks” which can be controlled to some degree and produce toy-camera effects similar to those achieved with a Holga or Diana Camera.

To get shots like this, you must first set a “ballpark” exposure while your lens is still attached. Just follow these simple steps:

  1. Power the camera on set the focus on manual and open it to infinity.
  2. Power the camera off, then detach the lens.
  3. Turn the camera back on and hold the lens backward against your camera body. 
  4. Then, move closer to the subject, within inches, until it becomes clear and click the shutter.

TIP: Remember, just the slightest movements (wind, camera shake, etc) really can affect your focus so try to hold your camera as steady as possible.  Also, check the image on the back of the camera. Adjustments to your exposure may be necessary.

I was using a Canon 5D Mark IV and found that if I held down the Depth of Field preview button while removing the lens it will lock the aperture closed to the f-stop setting. Keep in mind that the smaller difficult to see through the lens aperture.

I have read conflicting views on using Live View. When you turn your camera to Live View you are increasing the exposure of the sensor to the outside world, however, it is easier to see the effects in real time and watch your focus. It is best to use this technique in a relatively dry, dust-free environment.  

Once the photos have been captured, the lens should be remounted or a body cap installed to protect the mirror and sensor from dust or moisture. Frequent use of a bulb blower or electronic cleaning is recommended.

Let me know if you give this a try.