Week 17 April 22, 2020 Water Drop Photography; Persistence, Perseverance and Patience

Last week’s 52frames photo challenge was fast shutter speed, and for those who wanted to up the challenge, waterdrop photography. I found quite a few instructional videos that provide plenty of insight into the process, and I must say I learned a lot.

First, it isn’t the shutter speed that matters, it is the flash speed, and not all flashes are high speed, fast enough to catch and suspend the water drop without any sense of movement.

Second, in order to fill the frame with the image my macro lens had to be close to the action, which meant it was getting splashed, and I was cleaning my lens every few drops.

Third, there are a few mechanical timers that can be purchased to make this whole job easier, but they are not cheap, so I stuck to the manual process, a small plastic bag of water, dripping into a dish. Timing the drip, tripping the shutter, and flash to catch that beautiful drop after it hits the water is not easy. One photographer warned that this challenge would take persistence, perseverance, and patience.

As I was sitting watching the water drip from the bag into the dish, I think I was about 1% successful in the beginning, but as I practiced my timing got better and I think by the time I had enough good shots to participate in the challenge I was getting about a 20% success rate.

I would say that I persistently persevered and while my patience was tested I resolved to get it right. It reminded me of my days’ figure skating. I, like everyone, practiced, we practiced the jumps and dance steps and routines, over and over and over again, until we got them right, then we would do them again.

I am not sure I will continue with water drop photography, but I am glad I embraced the challenge it was a wonderful learning opportunity.

Week 5 – 2020 Photography

It has been another great week, spending time with my parents in Osoyoos BC, flying home to Calgary. Last week’s 52-frames challenge was “shot from above” I could not have time that any better.

delicate

I have been spending more time with flowers.

I hope you have been having a great week, your comments are appreciated, and I look forward to hearing from you

Week 4 – January 2020 Photography

Early Morning Osoyoos British Columbia
Osoyoos British Columbia Canad, lights across the lake

Two different views of Osoyoos reflected in Osoyoos Lake, it has been a quiet week visiting my parents. Osoyoos has become or is quickly becoming the snowbird capital of Canada. For those seniors who wish to escape the harsh winter conditions in their home town, Osoyoos has the shortest and warmest winter conditions of almost anywhere in Canada. It also has a community of seniors that is active and welcoming.

The 52 frames challenge this week was titled “Fill the Frame”

Winter Daisy

While out for our walk I spotted a large clump of daisies, one of my favorite flowers, and given how many flowers were on still on the stock, brown and withered I am going to guess that Osoyoos was hit with a sudden heavy frost early in the winter season. This was a bonus for me, using a technique called free-lensing to photograph the flowers to fill the frame. Free-lensing requires that I use my 50mm lens off-camera, turned backward, it magnifies the subject similar to a macro lens, for Lensbaby. The depth of field is very small, resulting in a very soft image, for some subjects this works very well. I did add a layer of texture in post-processing, adding depth to the dreamy nature of the image.

Below an image of licorice candy using the same free-lensing technique, and my second choice for the challenge. Which would have been your choice?

free-lensing – licorice candy still life

Just a quick reminder, if you are in the Calgary area, I hope you will drop by our Exposure 2020 event, we would love to see you there

That’s my news for the week, your comments are appreciated.
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You can find more of my photography at www.jmeyersforeman.com on Instagram or Facebook
I would love to hear from you.

Hola from Seville

I love the light and beautiful balconies

We arrived in Seville late last week, and we have enjoyed walking all the pedestrian streets. I love all the beautiful plazas, amazing architecture, and I especially love the light. Early morning light and the evening light along the streets! 

I have been participating with 52frames, a weekly photo challenge, 

week 4 –

Macro, admittedly I wasn’t overly inspired by the challenge, I was lucky to find the daffodils were blooming in my cousins garden. Thanks, Sharon and Bob for a lovely four days! 

Week 5 –

dirty, okay I am struggling with the challenge, and I am going to have to think about how I approach the challenges each week if I am going to keep them up. While I have been struggling, I have been inspired by the images submitted by many of the photographers, and this does help to motivate me. 

Week 6 – my desk, there are a few coffee shops, we have been enjoying the “coffee con leche” coffee with warm milk, as well as the wonderful pastries while I sit process image, so I pretty sure I will have a better submission this week. 

If you have any suggestions for off the beaten path things to do in or around Seville drop me a line, or if you want more info on the 52framers weekly photo challenge, let me know, I would be happy to send you a link. 

While we have been away I have launched a new website for images taken during our Camino to Santiago de Compostela, I would appreciate if you have a look. I would love to know if you have a favorite image, or if you have done the Camino, your favorite memory or location. 

To see our ongoing travel photos check out my Instagram feed. 

See you again soon. 

Free-lensing

 I have been experimenting with a new, for me, photographic techniques, free-lensing. I have experimented with this before, but this week I I took some time to read more about the technique and experiment with more intent. I have made some notes just in case you are interested in how this works or want to try this yourself.

Free-lensing, defined as a technique used with interchangeable lens cameras in both film-based and digital photography. The lens is detached from the camera and held in front of the lens mount by hand during exposure. This allows the lens to be tilted or shifted creating a similar effect to a perspective control or “Tilt-Shift” lens, only with a lower degree of fidelity. The result is a combination of selective focus and light leakage which are used creatively to create surreal imagery.

The lens used does not necessarily have to be native to the brand of camera, since it is not physically attached. In addition, the lens may also be reversed for Macro Photography. By shooting through a  lens backward, increased magnification can be achieved. One of the by-products of free-lensing is the introduction of “light leaks” which can be controlled to some degree and produce toy-camera effects similar to those achieved with a Holga or Diana Camera.

To get shots like this, you must first set a “ballpark” exposure while your lens is still attached. Just follow these simple steps:

  1. Power the camera on set the focus on manual and open it to infinity.
  2. Power the camera off, then detach the lens.
  3. Turn the camera back on and hold the lens backward against your camera body. 
  4. Then, move closer to the subject, within inches, until it becomes clear and click the shutter.

TIP: Remember, just the slightest movements (wind, camera shake, etc) really can affect your focus so try to hold your camera as steady as possible.  Also, check the image on the back of the camera. Adjustments to your exposure may be necessary.

I was using a Canon 5D Mark IV and found that if I held down the Depth of Field preview button while removing the lens it will lock the aperture closed to the f-stop setting. Keep in mind that the smaller difficult to see through the lens aperture.

I have read conflicting views on using Live View. When you turn your camera to Live View you are increasing the exposure of the sensor to the outside world, however, it is easier to see the effects in real time and watch your focus. It is best to use this technique in a relatively dry, dust-free environment.  

Once the photos have been captured, the lens should be remounted or a body cap installed to protect the mirror and sensor from dust or moisture. Frequent use of a bulb blower or electronic cleaning is recommended.

Let me know if you give this a try.

Spring in Calgary

Frost on the window; copyright jmeyersforeman 2015
Frost on the window; copyright jmeyersforeman 2015 

Spring is in the air, but there is still frost on the car window in the morning and I can’t resist taking mu camera with me for a few shots each morning. Tiny abstract landscapes. I hope you are enjoying your spring and finding gorgeous thing to look at.